Category Archives: 1780s

A gown for Mount Vernon

This lovely gown is headed to an interpreter in Virginia at historic Mount Vernon. This is our  Camille dress in a lovely indigo blue Cocheco Mills reproduction cotton print.

Under the gown is our chemisette in vintage white cotton lawn.

For more information about this gown or any of our custom historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com or email us at info@maggiemayfashions.com

Early 19th century apron

I came across this original early 19th century women’s work apron while doing a little research for a project. The cut follows the idea of the long narrow silhouette of the 1800s and the fabric detailing gives much information about the nature of work garments. I hope you find it interesting as well!

Front:

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Back:getimage

New policies for 2016

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Wow! We’ve had an amazing year! I feel like I say that at the end of every year, but 2015 really turned out to be one of our busiest of all time! I estimate over the course of the past 12 months, we stitched over 1200 yards of fabrics and completed over 300 garments! We lead 2 hands on workshops and gave 8 historical clothing presentations! What a year!

Looking ahead, we will be instituting a few new policies. As our markets and clientelle change, so must we. Effective January 1, 2016, we will be changing a few of our requirements. So here goes:

1. All film commissions will require payment in full at the time of order. Orders not paid in full within 10 days of order date will be subject to cancellation.

2. Effective January 1, 2016 a design fee will be added to production estimates for custom designed projects to cover the cost of pattern drafting, sizing, mock ups, and research (if applicable). Our design fee begins at $75.00 per design and is subject to change based upon individual projects (i.e. the more complicated the design, the higher the design cost).

3. Beginning in January, established clientelle will have priority completion dates. One of our biggest compliments is a returning customer and we would like to say thank you by offering priority scheduling.

4. Our reproduction fabric will now be dedicated exclusively to creating our custom historical garments. Any available yardage will be offered for immediate purchase on our IN STOCK page.

5. Our production calendar runs from January 2- May 31 and September 2- December 20. This allows us to spend our summer months conducting workshops, giving lectures, and attending conferences. All orders placed at the end of our production calendar will receive first priority at the beginning of the consecutive production season. We ship IN STOCK garments year round.

And just a gentle reminder:

All Maggie May Clothing images are protected under creative copyright and may not be shared or published in any way without written consent. This applies to our main website, our Etsy shop, and all affiliated social media sites.

Thanks and we look forward to another fabulous year of historical fashion!

More Regency Era short stays

Here is another completed example of our Regency Era short stays. Unlike the longer stays of this period, these do not employ a busk. Instead, they lace up the front with cotton ties. A separate adjustable tie runs across the top to secure the bust in place.

We have been adding adjustable straps to our design for some time now. This allows more flexibility in fit (different bust sizes require different levels of support). The lightly boned body provides not only a sturdy undergarment but also helps lift the bust- achieving the height so popular during this period.

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These stays should be worn over a shift but do not require any further layering under your Regency Era gown.

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For more information about these stays, or any of our Regency Era garments, please visit our catalog or email us at info@maggiemayfashions.com

Farmer’s smocks

The final two garments we made for an upcoming 1890s era short film set in rural America were two farmer’s frocks. The creative director wanted these made from burlap.

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Burlap is made of jute- a course and unrefined fiber. It is most suited for upholstery work and making sacks for dried foods. Historically, burlap was used for religious garb commonly referred to as sack cloth.

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Working with burlap posed a bit of a challenge. Because of the high fray tendencies of the material, I had to cut the smocks in as few pieces as possible. Fortunately, this is typical of period smocks as they were often cut from large rectangles. However, the interior seams had to be either french seamed or serged to eliminate fray and to reinforce stitching. Due to time constraints, I chose to serge the interior seams of these garments.

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As you can see, burlap has an extremely stiff hand. Notice how the front of this smock stands out no matter how much smoothing and coaxing it gets. It will take some work on the part of the creative director to get these two garments to drape as she sees fit.

Modified chemise

We recently completed several garments for an upcoming short film for a production company in New York City. We altered our existing chemise pattern to create this long, flowing undergarment.

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The full length full sleeves have ties a the cuff. Ties around around the neckline allow the wearer to adjust fullness. The front also features a button front opening and extra deep neckline. It is cut extra slim to avoid bulkiness. The production company also requested they be hemmed to floor length.

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