Category Archives: 1850s

Teen Boy’s Rural Sack coat

This boy’s cotton sack coat is headed to Historic Exchange Place in Kingsport, Tennessee and is indicative of the styles worn by teen boys throughout 19th century Southern Appalachia.

This sack coat is made of heavy weight plain weave brushed cotton in a natural green and is lined in roller printed cotton. The interior features a single patch pocket and four large wooden buttons close the front of the coat.

The cut of this coat is universal and would have been worn for outdoor work or as a dress coat.

For more information about this teen boy’s sack coat or any of our custom made historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Mid 19th century dresses of Appalachia

These mid 19th century dresses are based upon an extant homespun gown from North Carolina.They are headed to Historic Exchange Place living history farm in Kingsport Tennessee- in the heart of the Southern Appalachian Mountains.

For more information about our American South dress or any of our historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.comhttp://www.maggiemayfashions.com

 

Girl’s petticoats

These two styles of girl’s petticoats were popular during the early to mid 19th century. Our mini corded petticoat is a girl- size version of our women’s corded petticoat and was worn by children from the 1820s through the 1870s. It is made of checked cotton cloth and is meant to replicate the “recycling” of older adult garments into children’s clothing.

The starched and tucked cotton petticoat is a standard in children’s undergarments and would have been worn from childhood into the teenage years. (Shown layered over the corded petticoat in the 1840s style).

For more information about these petticoats or any of our historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Girl’s 1850s era dresses

These two girl’s dresses are both cut in the popular children’s style so prevalent during the 1850s and 1860s. The homespun dress is representative of everyday wear during this period whereas the pastel print dress is Sunday best. These two dresses are part of a larger commission for the historical interpretation program at Exchange Place in Kingsport, Tennessee  and represent the heyday (1850s) of the then stagecoach stop and town center.

For more information about these dresses or any of our historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

 

Romantic era bonnets

Finishing off a large commission from a museum in Pennsylvania are these gorgeous silk drawn bonnets. Ideal in shape and size for the 1840s, these ultra feminine bonnets are lightweight, fuss- free and a breeze to wear.

Drawn bonnet in linen and silk

For more information about our silk bonnets or any of our custom made millinery, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Mid 19th century boy’s plaid suit

This boy’s shirt, trousers, and waistcoat is suitable for mid 19th century middle class attire. It is made of plaid cotton suiting and wooden buttons. The shirt is muslin with wooden buttons as well. This boy’s ensemble is headed to a museum group in Bergen, Norway.

boyssuit

For more information about this suit or any of our historical children’s clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com or email us a info@maggiemayfashions.com

Crinolette

We recently completed this shortened cage crinoline for the Oregon Shakespeare’s production of “The Wiz.” This garment is actually based upon a mid 1850s era crinolette.

crinolette

Our cage is made of coated steel encased in cotton twill. The cage has a 29″ waist and is 90″ at its fullest circumference.

For more information about this garment or any of our custom made historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com or email us at info@maggiemayfashions.com