Category Archives: Commissions

WWI US Motor Corps Uniform

Earlier this Spring we completed a WWI Era US Motor Corps Uniform for The State of TN. It was and EPIC project! From original buttons to sourcing “just the right shade of wool,” attention to detail was paramount. I completely drafted the pattern myself. Both the jacket and skirt are fully lined. The shirt and tie I picked up at a local second hand shop to use for the photo. I purchased the reproduction Sam Browne Belt on Ebay.

For more information about our WWI Era US Motor Corps Uniform or any of our custom designed historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

1875 serviceable dress

This 19th century day dress was designed for a house museum exhibit in Sterling Heights, Michigan. Inspired by an original gown in the Met, this cotton version is meant to celebrate the rural heritage of the now suburban community. A second gown in a later style is being designed to represent Sterling Height’s connection to urban Detroit. The two gowns will be exhibited side by side.

Original gown c. 1875 of wool and silk. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

This gown has been carefully curated to accurately capture the heritage of this city. Original photographs of area families from the late 19th century were referenced and an overall look and feel of the exhibit was discussed. Together we settled upon this gown for its simplicity and practicality of style.

For more information about this custom designed gown or any of our historical  clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com.

WWI Hello Girl Uniform

This WWI Era Hello Girl Uniform was meticulously researched for accuracy and authenticity as it was designed for exhibition at Alvin C. York State Park in Tennessee.

The Hello Girls, also known as the Signal Corps Female Telephone Operators Unit were an auxiliary unit of the US Army during WWI. Experienced, bilingual female telephone operators were recruited by the US Army and sent overseas to aid the failing communication lines of the Allies in wartime France. In 1917, over 7000 US women applied but only 450 were enlisted. This small group of skilled women paved the way for future generations and helped secure the role of women as vital assets in the US military.

Required to purchase their own uniforms, and being paid only $50 per month proved to be a barrier for many women. As they were required to wear their uniforms at all times (even on leave), two uniforms of the same style were devised. Winter uniforms were made of wool and summer uniforms of cotton sateen. However, purchasing two uniforms plus an overcoat, hat, and rank- designating insignias dwindled their measly earnings down to pennies. Therefore it can be surmised that most Hello Girls viewed their positions as patriotic rather than an income generating endeavor. While considered merely contract civilians by the US Army, the Hello Girls instead referred to themselves as the “first women’s combatant unit in the U.S. Army.”

Our replica WWI Hello Girl uniform is made from wool and is cut in the style of the original. The buttons are original eagle buttons as were worn by all WWI era serviceman (and women!).

For more information about our WWI Era Hello Girl Uniform or any of our custom designed historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Regency era chemise dress

This month we completed a regency era gown cut in the transitional style of the chemise dresses of the late 18th century. This gown is made from a period print cotton with a silk and tulle sash. This gown is headed to a client in Canada for a Regency era ball. This gown is a custom made Marie dress from a print chosen from our collection.

For more information about our Marie dress or any of our custom made historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

1850s era denim jacket

This reproduction women’s denim jacket is a custom designed/custom commissioned 1850s era piece based on this original in the collection of FIT.

Working with the client, we decided upon a darker denim and a full quilted cotton lining.

The jacket features wooden buttons and lots of hand- stitched details. I chose to use a bright, white thread to showcase the stitching.

You can view the jacket in action here!

Our Historic Farmer tells us about Gulf Coast Sheep.

Posted by Historic Brattonsville on Friday, December 29, 2017

For more information about this jacket or any of our custom commissions, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Old West dress

This 1880s era bustle gown is a custom made version of our Harvest Bustle gown. It is headed to a client in Wyoming who is putting together a Lizzy Borden impression. Lizzie was arrested and tried for murders of her parents in 1892. However, she was acquitted in 1893 and continued to live in Fall River, Massachusetts until her death, on June 1, 1927. The case was never solved.

For more information about this dress or any of our custom made garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

CostumeWorks costumes!

These three Regency Era garments are headed to CostumeWorks for a theatrical production in Boston. The fabrics were provided by the production company and the designs are ours. The dresses are our Marie dress and the Spencer jacket features a modified collar and cuff combination. The garments will be distressed and aged before they hit the stage!

For more information about these garments of any of our custom made historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Mid 19th century dresses of Appalachia

These mid 19th century dresses are based upon an extant homespun gown from North Carolina.They are headed to Historic Exchange Place living history farm in Kingsport Tennessee- in the heart of the Southern Appalachian Mountains.

For more information about our American South dress or any of our historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.comhttp://www.maggiemayfashions.com