Category Archives: Commissions

Custom garments we have made for clients

WWI Motor Corps Uniform- Part Deux

I recently completed a second WWI Era US Motor Corps Uniform for a private client in Texas. This uniform is made from 100% olive green drab wool and is lined in cotton. The buttons are reproductions as is the Sam Browne belt. The shirt and tie are up cycled and very similar in style to those of the period.

Curse you wrinkles in the skirt! I either need new iron or a steamroller! I pressed and pressed and steamed and steamed but they are still there! URGH!

Having made several versions of these WWI era uniforms in the past year, this one is slightly different than the first version we made for Alvin C. York State Park last year. We modified the cut of the bodice to reflect a closer fitting silhouette and widened the jacket skirting so it closes neatly in the front. The wool is a rougher weave and has slightly more texture. The buttons are reproduction brass military eagles and still have the sheen the originals would have prior to 100 years of patina!

Love the look of the shiny brass buttons! They are just as they would have during the war!

Very little modifications have been made to the skirt. It is fully lined in cotton and has two pockets at the hipline. Hem length reaches mid calf.

Even though I have already made one of these uniforms, it is still a beast! It took over 40 hours of labor to create this piece with 5 hours dedicated to just the pockets! However, all good things come with time and this is a beautiful museum quality reproduction! A big thank you to my client for her patience while I searched for just the right wool, did a little more research, and allowed me the time needed to construct this garment with care!

I have not yet made the necessary adjustments to this reproduction Sam Browne belt. When being used by women, the belt typically needs to be made smaller and the chest strap shorter!

I would love to make a version of this uniform with the jodhpurs! Any takers?

For more information about our WWI Era Motor Corps uniform or any of our custom designed historical fashion, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

1838 transitional dress

Earlier this year we launched a new design- our Anne dress– a late 1830s/early 1840s transitional style gown. This dress is based off an original in the Tasha Tudor Collection and is a longer sleeve version of our Brooks dress.

Our 1838 transitional gown in an earthy natural green cotton roller printed fabric

We quickly received our first commission for a custom made version of this gown. It is made up in an authentic reproduction 1830s era moss green cotton print. This dress is headed to Historic Brattonsville for one of their new volunteer interpreters!

The center back of our gown closes with either buttons or hook and eyes

This custom made Anne dress is shown over 2 extra full petticoats. Finish off the look with a chemise and corset.

Delicate piped details around the yoked neckline

For more information about our Anne dress or any of our custom and ready made historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Vienna Teng’s Gravity Dress

When I was just getting started as a serious designer, I was commissioned to make this dress by Fat Monster Films for Vienna Teng’s Gravity video. It was one of my first original designs and I still remember those gorgeous vintage 19th century jet buttons I stitched down the back. Seems like just yesterday but it was over 10 years ago! It was the first time I ever saw something I had made on an international platform. (Turns out it would not be the last!) It’s lovely to see the gown immortalized in this beautiful and haunting musical video. I very much appreciate people like Mark Johnson and his crew who gave me a chance in those early years. I am truly grateful!

Enjoy!

Vienna Teng in her dress by Maggie May Clothing.

1840s-1850s era work dress

This 1840s-1850s era work dress is a custom made version of our American South dress with apron. It is headed to Historic Exchange Place in Kingsport, Tennessee to be worn by their Junior Apprentices.

Fore more information about our American South dress or any of our custom made garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Victorian corset for rural wear

This lovely Victorian era over bust corset is fashioned from pink and beige ticking with a full cotton lining. This summer weight corset will be worn while working on a living history farm and is designed for maximum comfort. This corset is easily laundered, is lightweight, yet durable enough for daily wear.

For more information about our over bust corsets or any of our custom made garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

WWI Hello Girl Summer uniform

This cotton sateen uniform is inspired by the summer uniforms worn by the Hello Girls during WWI.

(Ugh! Still working on that stand and fold collar! I am going to master it yet!)

For this uniform, I selected a cotton/poly blend (65/35) as 100% cotton sateen tends to lose its luster after a single washing. And because I wanted this uniform to retain as much luster as possible, I chose a blend over all natural. Sometimes you have to compromise! Plus, the weight of this cotton satin was absolutely ideal for this piece. (Modern all natural cotton sateen tends to be rather thin. Think sheets! Or lining in this case!) Amazingly this cotton satin has the feel of silk satin! It was really lovely to work with. (Note- cotton satin and cotton sateen are interchangeable terms).

The buttons are reproduction brass eagles and lack the years of bronzing their antique counterparts have. I like to leave the patina on antique brass so the brightness of these reproductions were the way to go on this uniform. The jacket is fully lined in a 100% cotton sateen.

Original WWI cotton sateen summer uniform (image courtesy Ebay)

The Hello Girl uniform was officially known as a US Signal Corp Uniform and was issued to women working overseas as bilingual translators on the European front. The Hello Girls were some of the first women to officially enter into military service and were issued 2 uniforms- 1 winter uniform of wool and 1 summer uniform of cotton sateen.

While issued uniforms by the US Army and commissioned to work on base, the Hello Girls were viewed as civilian contractors and were never offered a pension or any military benefits. It was not until the late 1970s that the US gov’t acknowledged these women’s service and contributions to our country during WWI.

Fore more information about our WWI era uniforms or any of our custom order garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

WWI Signal Corps Uniform- with follow up image!

This wool uniform is inspired by ones worn during WWI by the US Signal Corps Women- also known as the Hello Girls. This 100% worsted wool uniform features reproduction brass buttons and is fully lined in cotton sateen. This uniform was created to honor the first women to enter into service in the US Army and will be worn in NYC’s Veteran’s Day parade.

As I continue to research this uniform, I realized the jacket body is slightly more contoured than I originally thought. It has seams that run down the center front sides (see original image below) and so I adjusted my pattern to reflect this. The stand and fall collar however continues to perplex me and I need to spend more time tweaking and adjusting it to get it “just right.”

Side seams- Check! Stand and Fall collar that does not look/feel like a chiropractic device- still working on that….

Follow up: Here is an image from our fantastic client waring this Hello Girl Uniform! Her husband made the insignias. She is pictured with a group of French soldiers. How awesome to see the uniform in action! Thanks JB for the photo! And thank you for allowing us to make this for you!

For more information about this uniform or any of our custom made historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Hello Girl Uniform

We recently completed our second commission for a WWI Hello Girls Uniform. This uniform is made of navy blue twill wool* and a cotton sateen lining. The buttons are original.

For the second uniform, I tweaked a few things on my pattern- including a slightly more fitted jacket body and fuller jacket skirt at center back. I narrowed the skirt and added pockets.

I found the worsted wool lovely to work with. It held its body beautifully and created a gorgeous skirt. It felt very authentic in look and feel. The jacket was a dream as well and in the end, I really love the way this uniform turned out. It has that “original feel” to it and the color/ texture added a whole new dimension that melton wool cannot achieve. (Melton tends to look flat in my opinion.)

Now onto more WWI Hello Girls uniforms! We have commissions for 6 more of these already this year!

For more information about our WWI Hello Girl Uniform or any of our custom designed historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com