Romantic Era smocked gowns

As part of a larger commission for a museum in Pennsylvania, we constructed these two custom made late 1830s-early 1840s era gowns for their historical interpretation program. Made of 100% cotton reproduction prints, these two gown can be worn as shown or over a chemisette. Matching bonnets were also designed to complete the ensemble.

For more information about this Romantic era gown or any of our custom made garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

New Romantic Era dress!

Introducing our NEW Romantic era design- the ANNE dress!

Embodying the transitional silhouette of the late 1830s and early 1840s, the Anne dress features characteristics of both decades. The bodice features a wide open neckline with a gathered bodice that tapers into a fitted waistband. The close fitting capped sleeves open up into full gathered puffs at the elbow and end in buttoned cuffs. The skirt is approximately 130″ wide and is hemmed to the ankle. The gown’s yoke and cap sleeves are fully lined and the dress closes in the back with either hook and eyes or buttons. Both the neckline and sleeves feature self made piped trim. This gown will be just as gorgeous in silk or wool as it is shown here in our reproduction 1830s era cotton print!

For more information about our NEW ANNE dress, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com!

Bold and Bright 1830s dresses

These two bold and bright 1830s era gowns are part of a large commission headed to a museum in Pennsylvania. These dresses are made of 100% replica print cotton with large Gigot sleeves tapered to the wrist. The bodices are fully lined in muslin and button down the front for ease of dressing. The skirt is approximately 130″ wide and is hemmed to the ankle. The neckline and sleeves seams are piped with self made trim.

These two gowns also include a contrasting1830s era pinner apron. This gown can be worn as a work dress with the apron or with a matching belt (not shown) for dressier occasions.

For more information about these 1830s era gowns or any of our historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com.

Custom Victorian Era corsets

These two Victorian Era corsets are part of a large commission headed to a museum in Pennsylvania. These lightweight corsets are ideal for daily wear while still maintaining their shape and allowing for flexibility and movement.

For more information about these custom made victorian era corsets or any of our custom made historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com.

1870s homesteader dress

These three dresses are headed to the C&O National Historical Park in Cumberland Maryland. These dresses are inspired by the movement West after the American Civil War. They are made of high quality, replica print cotton. The bodices and sleeves are fully lined.

The skirt is cut longer in the back to accommodate a small bustle pad.

For more information about our 1870s era homesteader dress, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Girl’s Bustle era dress

This sweet little bustle era dress is more costume than history but is absolutely adorable!
The little girl this dress was made for lovingly dubbed it her, “oreo” dress.

So sweet!
For more information about this gown or any of our custom made historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com or email us at info@maggiemayfashions.com

John Hopkins Base 18

This series of garments was created for The Maryland Military Museum’s 2017 exhibit on John Hopkins Base 18 and WWI era nurse Bessie Baker.

After looking at several original images of Bessie Baker both prior to and during the War, I decided upon this design for her uniform.

The design of her uniform is actually a blend of her prewar nursing uniform, her war era uniform, an illustration found in a WWI era recruitment poster, and an extant JHH gown in the collection of John Hopkins School of Medicine Archives.

Her cape is drawn directly from this one in the John Hopkins School of Medicine Archives.

In addition, I also created a nurse’s cap, armband, and located a pair of black shoes in the style of the pair shown in this period illustration.

This was by far my most heavily researched commission for 2016 but also one of the most fascinating.

For more information about this gown or any of our custom historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com or email us at info@maggiemayfashions.com