Girl’s early 19th century straw bonnets

These simple and sweet girls’ bonnets are ideal for the years 1800-1850s. Worn by girls of all ages, these little darlings are headed to Historic Exchange Place in Jonesboro, Tennessee to be worn by their Junior Apprentices. The girls who participate in this program range in age from 10-18.

For more information about these girls bonnets or any of our millinery, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

1850s Autumn jacket

This 1850s era wool jacket was styled after an original lady’s denim jacket in the Met.

Made of 100% wool yarn dyed homespun with cotton lining, this jacket is just enough to keep the chill away during crisp Autumn evenings. It has a small patch pocket tucked away in the interior to hide any small incidental items a lady farmer might need.

This jacket is headed to Historic Brattonsville to be used in their 19th century farm life interpretation program.

For more information about this jacket or any of our custom designed historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Rural Lady’s Better dress

This 1880s era gown was designed for a museum display in Michigan. It was styled to represent a rural woman’s “better” or “best” dress. It is a modified version of our Harvest Bustle gown.


Made of 100% cotton, it is serviceable and easily laundered. Styled in the latest fashion, this dress uses little expensive trim yet is striking with its contrasting fabrics. The brown striped print is a reproduction 19th century print. The one piece skirt features a bustled back that is worn over a small bustle pad and petticoat.

For more information about this gown or any of our custom designed historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

New website underway!


New logo for a new website!

Times are a chang’in (even though our clothes are not!) and we are transitioning to a new, super snazzy mobile friendly, more interactive website! I guess it’s time to change the old c. 2000 static HTML based site. Sigh. (Historians don’t like change you know!)

We will be doing our best to keep the old site live until the new one is completely finished. But if you happen by chance to run into our new site- never fear. Just think of it as a sneak preview.

Also, remember the studio is currently closed for the summer. However, we are taking orders for our FALL production season which begins August 2. Just drop us an email! Be sure to get those orders in early as our calendar tends to fill up quickly!

Our shop is currently getting a fresh new coat of paint and solid cleaning. Be sure to check out Instagram #maggiemayfashions #maggiemayclothing and Facebook for pics of progress!

WWI US Motor Corps Uniform

Earlier this Spring we completed a WWI Era US Motor Corps Uniform for The State of TN. It was and EPIC project! From original buttons to sourcing “just the right shade of wool,” attention to detail was paramount. I completely drafted the pattern myself. Both the jacket and skirt are fully lined. The shirt and tie I picked up at a local second hand shop to use for the photo. I purchased the reproduction Sam Browne Belt on Ebay.

For more information about our WWI Era US Motor Corps Uniform or any of our custom designed historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

1875 serviceable dress

This 19th century day dress was designed for a house museum exhibit in Sterling Heights, Michigan. Inspired by an original gown in the Met, this cotton version is meant to celebrate the rural heritage of the now suburban community. A second gown in a later style is being designed to represent Sterling Height’s connection to urban Detroit. The two gowns will be exhibited side by side.

Original gown c. 1875 of wool and silk. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

This gown has been carefully curated to accurately capture the heritage of this city. Original photographs of area families from the late 19th century were referenced and an overall look and feel of the exhibit was discussed. Together we settled upon this gown for its simplicity and practicality of style.

For more information about this custom designed gown or any of our historical  clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com.

WWI American Red Cross Ward Uniform

We recently made one of our WWI era American Red Cross Ward nurse uniform with armband (not shown) for The American Museum in Britain’s exhibition entitled Side by Side: America in WWI running March 29- October 28, 2018.

This gown is part of an exhibit of a reconstructed hospital ward intended to give the audience a glimpse into early 20th century medicine and treatment in wartime Europe.

Image courtesy The American Museum in Britain

Our WWI era Ward uniform is based on photographs and written descriptions of the period. For more information about our WWI Ward uniform or any of our historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

WWI Hello Girl Uniform

This WWI Era Hello Girl Uniform was meticulously researched for accuracy and authenticity as it was designed for exhibition at Alvin C. York State Park in Tennessee.

The Hello Girls, also known as the Signal Corps Female Telephone Operators Unit were an auxiliary unit of the US Army during WWI. Experienced, bilingual female telephone operators were recruited by the US Army and sent overseas to aid the failing communication lines of the Allies in wartime France. In 1917, over 7000 US women applied but only 450 were enlisted. This small group of skilled women paved the way for future generations and helped secure the role of women as vital assets in the US military.

Required to purchase their own uniforms, and being paid only $50 per month proved to be a barrier for many women. As they were required to wear their uniforms at all times (even on leave), two uniforms of the same style were devised. Winter uniforms were made of wool and summer uniforms of cotton sateen. However, purchasing two uniforms plus an overcoat, hat, and rank- designating insignias dwindled their measly earnings down to pennies. Therefore it can be surmised that most Hello Girls viewed their positions as patriotic rather than an income generating endeavor. While considered merely contract civilians by the US Army, the Hello Girls instead referred to themselves as the “first women’s combatant unit in the U.S. Army.”

Our replica WWI Hello Girl uniform is made from wool and is cut in the style of the original. The buttons are original eagle buttons as were worn by all WWI era serviceman (and women!).

For more information about our WWI Era Hello Girl Uniform or any of our custom designed historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com