Retirement Announcement!

I bet that heading got your attention! Never fear! We here at Maggie May Clothing are NOT retiring… but two of our designs are!

Beginning in January 2018, The Godey Dress and The Varina dress will be taking to the closet as we make room for fresh new designs from the Victorian Era! Keep your eyes peeled throughout the Spring as we unveil our exciting new projects!

The Godey dress was wildly popular for many years! Several versions of this lovely blue gown are scattered across the United States!

The Varina Dress was originally created for a film in 2008!

CostumeWorks costumes!

These three Regency Era garments are headed to CostumeWorks for a theatrical production in Boston. The fabrics were provided by the production company and the designs are ours. The dresses are our Marie dress and the Spencer jacket features a modified collar and cuff combination. The garments will be distressed and aged before they hit the stage!

For more information about these garments of any of our custom made historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Teen Boy’s Rural Sack coat

This boy’s cotton sack coat is headed to Historic Exchange Place in Kingsport, Tennessee and is indicative of the styles worn by teen boys throughout 19th century Southern Appalachia.

This sack coat is made of heavy weight plain weave brushed cotton in a natural green and is lined in roller printed cotton. The interior features a single patch pocket and four large wooden buttons close the front of the coat.

The cut of this coat is universal and would have been worn for outdoor work or as a dress coat.

For more information about this teen boy’s sack coat or any of our custom made historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Mid 19th century dresses of Appalachia

These mid 19th century dresses are based upon an extant homespun gown from North Carolina.They are headed to Historic Exchange Place living history farm in Kingsport Tennessee- in the heart of the Southern Appalachian Mountains.

For more information about our American South dress or any of our historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.comhttp://www.maggiemayfashions.com

 

Girl’s petticoats

These two styles of girl’s petticoats were popular during the early to mid 19th century. Our mini corded petticoat is a girl- size version of our women’s corded petticoat and was worn by children from the 1820s through the 1870s. It is made of checked cotton cloth and is meant to replicate the “recycling” of older adult garments into children’s clothing.

The starched and tucked cotton petticoat is a standard in children’s undergarments and would have been worn from childhood into the teenage years. (Shown layered over the corded petticoat in the 1840s style).

For more information about these petticoats or any of our historical clothing, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Girl’s 1850s era dresses

These two girl’s dresses are both cut in the popular children’s style so prevalent during the 1850s and 1860s. The homespun dress is representative of everyday wear during this period whereas the pastel print dress is Sunday best. These two dresses are part of a larger commission for the historical interpretation program at Exchange Place in Kingsport, Tennessee  and represent the heyday (1850s) of the then stagecoach stop and town center.

For more information about these dresses or any of our historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

 

Girl’s 1840s frontier dress

This 1840s era girls’ dresses is cut in the style of the period. This dress and apron are part of a larger commission headed to Historic Exchange Place in Kingsport, Tennessee. During the early part of the 19th century, Exchange Place was a stagecoach stop for settlers heading west into the then wilderness of Eastern Tennessee.

This sweet little dress is quite possibly my favorite from this commission.

For more information about these dresses or any of our custom designed historical garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com

Girl’s 1830s era dresses

These two girl’s 1830s era dresses are part of a larger commission for Historic Exchange Place’s Junior Apprentice interpretation program in Kingsport, Tennessee. These garments represent the clothing worn by the children in emerging frontier towns of early 19th century Appalachia.

Girl’s dress cut in the fashionable 1830s era style and made of gorgeous Turkey red reproduction print cotton.

Dress cut in the style of the late 1830s transitioning into the 1840s.

For more information about these dresses or any of our custom made garments, please visit our website at www.maggiemayfashions.com